News and Views

Sessions

There is a regular music session every Tuesday at the Hope and Anchor in Daltongate, Ulverston. Starting around 9 pm, musicians and singers are all welcome. 

The Prince of Wales at Foxfield has a session every 2nd and 4th Wednesday of the month.

There is a singers’ session at the Black Dog just outside of Dalton every 3rd Wednesday of the month, starting about 7 30 pm.

Ali Kyle has a music session in the Swan Inn, Swan Street Ulverston on the 3rd Friday of the month.

Vin Garbutt

We are saddened to learn of Vin Garbutt’s passing earlier today at the age of 69, weeks after undergoing major heart surgery.

Vin fell in love with folk music playing in the clubs that sprang up throughout the area in the 1960s, including the Rifle in Cannon Street, Stockton Folk Club at the Stork and Castle pub and Eston Folk Club in the Cleveland Bay.

He completed an apprenticeship as a turner at ICI but became a professional musician in 1969, quickly establishing himself the most sought-after solo performer on the UK folk scene.

He also played in the United States and regularly tours Europe, Australia, New Zealand and the Far East.

He was named Best Live Act in the 2001 BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards and was presented with an honorary degree from Teesside University.

Vin made an invaluable contribution to Teesside folklore and developed a unique brand of humour that brought tears of laughter to audiences throughout the world.

However, many of his songs were deadly serious and addressed some of this biggest issues facing the world today. He could have you crying with laughter one minute and crying with sadness the next. Thirty years ago Vin was so moved by the story of a local woman who fought for the right of her son, born with spina bifida, to live that he wrote a song about it. He called the woman Linda and her son Kevin. The song proved one of his most popular, with him recalling that after singing it on Danish radio, the station received the most calls they’d ever had in response to a song.

On one of his recent visits to Ulverston most of his patter was about his first round of heart surgery – a subject that most people would treat extremely seriously; but not Vin.  The doctor prescribed him some medicine that would have the side effect of making him pee like a horse. It did indeed. As a result he got banned out of the Arndale centre. When the surgeon told him that he was going to have a new groundbreaking procedure which had only been done 12 times before, his reaction was “What? I’m the 13th?” At the end of the night he announced that he would have to be re-booked as he hadn’t finished telling us about the surgery.

Our deepest sympathy and heartfelt condolences to his wife Pat and their family.

 

 

Late addition to the festival line up

We have an extra dance side appearing at the festival.
Stone the Crows are a Border Morris side based in Leyland in Lancashire, and with over 40 members, are a well-established group of ordinary men and women who share a passion for English traditional dance.
The Border tradition originates from the English / Welsh border counties of Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Shropshire.
In lean times such as winter, agricultural workers would take to the streets to dance for money, disguising their faces and wearing tattered coats to grab your attention.
Their raucous stick dances derive from the towns and villages along the border, brought to life with energetic musicians and an irreverent sense of fun. . Some of the dances are traditional, collected and recorded by those keen to preserve Britain’s rural, cultural heritage as the rise of industry, cities, transportation and even war threatened to wipe them out.
Other dances demonstrate a modern tradition, with collecting and sharing of tunes and dances between fellow Border teams. They have a few dances they’ve created too, like ‘Sod Hall’, ‘S.T.C’ and ‘Ratty’. As part of a living tradition, their repertoire changes as new dances are learned and older ones given a rest.

The Unthanks at the Forum Barrow

The Unthanks are performing How The Wild Wind Blows at the Forum Barrow on Sunday 7 May at 7.30 pm

Molly Drake, mother of Nick Drake, and poet and songwriter in her own right, made recordings at home during the 1950s with the help of her husband, and though never released at the time, share plenty of common ground with her celebrated son’s – charming and bittersweet, yet dark and pensive. In the eyes of the Mercury-nominated Unthanks, Molly’s work is extraordinary enough to rank alongside and independently of Nick’s.

In addition to the live re-imaginings by The Unthanks the audio-visual concert will feature film footage of Molly Drake, and her poetry, recorded and spoken by daughter Gabrielle Drake.
Click now for info and tickets: http://bit.ly/2jWK57S

The Unthanks – How Wild The Wind Blows

Tickets  £20 available, please visit the website or ring the Box Office on (01229) 820000.

Vicky Swann and Jonny Dyer added to the 2017 festival line up.

We are delighted to announce the return of Vicky Swann and Jonny Dyer to the Furness Tradition Festival. They made quite an impact with our audiences in 2013 when, as well as playing as a duo, they also performed ‘The Whispering Road’ with Nick Hennessey.

Vicki and Jonny have developed a strong reputation for a delivering great performances time and time again. Once known mainly for for their instrumental skills with Scottish smallpipes, accordion and Swedish nyckelharpa, they are now being accepted as impressive song arrangers and writers.

They blend traditional material with contemporary interpretations whilst creating original self penned tunes and songs that are entirely at home in the tradition.